Monthly Archives: September 2020


Considering The Best of Times and the Worst of Times in Business


by on Sep 22, 2020 1:28 PM

Considering The Best of Times and the Worst of Times in Business

In trying to make sense of 2020, I can’t help but think of Charles Dickens’ famous first line in A Tale of Two Cities which reads, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”. For most of us, these could be considered the worst of times as humanity has been affected by COVID-19, social unrest, and political division. Would anyone consider this the best of times as well? Call me crazy but in all this imbalance, I believe, lay an opportunity before us – the ability to uncover, recognize and utilize our untapped strengths.

When COVID hit, individuals and companies were quickly forced to work, think, manage, hire, market and sell differently. We had to adjust regardless of whether we were ready, willing, or able. As I’ve seen with my network of clients and associates, resiliency, innovation, and efficiency were just some byproducts of this challenge. Defeat was not an option.

What also rings true is that we’ve been afforded the time for self-reflection. The events of this year have encouraged people in business to become better educated, more understanding, and empathetic. We’re leaning into discomfort and growing ever wiser.

Personally, I’ve had what I call “COVID moments” during this downtime. Splashes of clarity enveloped me, and I recognized long term behavioral patterns that no longer served me. I was left with the hunger to give back. I brought one of those A-HA moments to my team and it has now been built into what we call the Trilogy Mentorship Program. For more information, click here.

Aldous Huxley’s title Brave New World causes me to pause as I assess this 2020 experience. Thinking about the courage and determination exemplified by those who’ve put themselves at risk for the greater good never mind the lessons we’ve collectively learned, I wonder if he was writing his dystopian novel today would the story line remain the same?


About Andrea Grubb

Andrea Grubb is the Chief Integrator Officer at Trilogy Partners. Trilogy Partners is an advisory & implementation firm whose mission is to help companies grow and transform.  We accomplish this by focusing on 3 critical business areas: Financial, Strategy & People.

NOT Just Another Manic Monday with EOS®


by on Sep 15, 2020 2:32 PM

NOT Just Another Manic Monday with EOS®

I have the best memories of growing up in the 1980s. The trends (big hair, shoulder pads, leotards with legwarmers), high school football games (Go SPFHS Raiders!), iconic movies (Breakfast Club, Top Gun, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off) and of course, the timeless music (Dancing in the Dark, Livin’ on a Prayer, Don’t Stop Believin’)!

One song from the ‘80s that is still popular today is Manic Monday by The Bangles. How many memes are centered around the dreaded Sunday night, the prelude to Manic Monday? And while I often felt that way in the past, I no longer have that sense of dread since I started working at Trilogy Partners. Why not? Because Trilogy practices EOS®, The Entrepreneurial Operating System™, a set of simple concepts and tools that helps our company gain better vision, traction, and oversight while improving communication and accountability.

Every Monday morning, we start our week with a Level 10, an EOS® term for our 90-minute meeting. This meeting starts on time, ends on time, and follows the same agenda each week. We start with Segue, five minutes to focus and hear good news from our team. Then, we look at our Scorecard that provides transparency on key performance indicators and identifies potential issues. We review our quarterly ROCKS (Goals), share Prospect & Employee Headlines and review our To Do List, as it relates to achieving our ROCKS. Most of our time is dedicated to IDS (Identify/Discuss/Solve), a method to solve issues. Lastly, we conclude, and rank the meeting for productivity and effectiveness on a scale of 1-10. Then we all hit the ground running, knowing exactly what our priorities are for the week ahead.

For some, this may seem rigid but here are just some of the reasons I thrive working at an EOS® company:

1) I am more engaged and feel like an integral member of the team; we have transparency, so I understand why decisions are made and their potential impact.

2) Roles are clear and expectations are understood; this allows me to focus on my most critical To Do’s and hold my colleagues accountable for theirs.

3) Issues do not linger for weeks and months on end; using IDS, we are collaborative, decisive, and everyone knows their role.

4) Two-way communication and respectful conflict move the company in a forward direction, and I feel safe sharing my opinions without retaliation.

5) We plan as a team, collaborate as a team, overcome obstacles as a team, and celebrate as a team.

I’ve long been an advocate for improving employee engagement and corporate culture, but it is far more difficult to accomplish than one might think. EOS® answers the “HOW” to achieve growth and business success while increasing focus and enjoyment.

Heard about EOS® but not sure how it can make a difference in your organization? Click to learn how Trilogy can help.


About Tamie Palatine

Tamie Palatine is the Director of Sales Support & Marketing at Trilogy Partners. Trilogy Partners is an advisory & implementation firm whose mission is to help companies grow and transform.  We accomplish this by focusing on 3 critical business areas: Financial, Strategy & People.

Implementing the Pace of Change in Business


by on Sep 9, 2020 2:05 PM

Implementing the Pace of Change in Business

Let’s examine implementing the pace of change in business. I recently found a quote by the late management guru, Peter Drucker, that read: “The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence—it is to act with yesterday’s logic.”

As I think back on 2020, this statement could not be truer. Forced into turbulence by a global pandemic, businesses had to adapt – we could not act with yesterday’s logic and had to pivot quickly.

However, under normal circumstances, as suggested in my recent articles, Setting the Pace of Change and Determining the Pace of Change, there are factors that impact strategic decisions. In this article, I share a word of caution, even when changes are thoughtfully identified, plans are rarely implemented perfectly.

The best plan will incorporate some flexibility to deal with issues such as internal processes, market dynamics, or emotional resistance. Lack of structure can jeopardize the entire change initiative. On the other hand, excessive structure can be too confining to succeed.

Leaders charged with implementation will need to be sensitive to assess how employees are adjusting and moving the process forward. They may find it necessary to accelerate or slow down the determined pace of change temporarily. Some critical guiding principles for leaders include:

  • the need for trusted and skilled people throughout the organization to keep their finger on the pulse of team. These people need to be able to recognize self-protective behaviors, false enthusiasm or comfort levels, fears, and anger.
  • good sonar and radar systems to help them identify things hiding below the surface and threats that could blindside them.
  • the confidence to question and challenge all assumptions about information they receive, depending upon trusted team members to perform due diligence and push the perceived limits.

Remembering that there is no single pace for change in an organization is necessary. This empowers leaders to make mid-course adjustments and process changes to keep moving in the same direction.

The important factor in implementing the pace of change is getting everyone to the desired destination at the same time without losing key people, skills, and knowledge along the way.

Trilogy Partners has a long history of helping our clients implement successful change. Read some of our success stories HERE and contact us HERE.


About Hal Levenson

Hal Levenson is the Founder and Chief Visionary Officer at Trilogy Partners. Trilogy Partners is an advisory & implementation firm whose mission is to help companies grow and transform. We accomplish this by focusing on 3 critical business areas: FinancialStrategy & People.

Determining the Pace of Change in Business


by on Sep 3, 2020 12:37 PM

Determining the Pace of Change in Business

Let’s look at determining the pace of change in business. In a recent blog, I introduced the idea of Setting the Pace of Change. There are several factors to consider and when determining the cadence, leadership faces an added challenge. They must balance the realities of the business with the emotional impact that could damage the human resource infrastructure.

So how do change leaders push back against ‘status quo’ that holds strong investment and commitment from employees – and corporate leaders? They must make the case that ‘status quo’ is no longer adequate to keep the firm relevant and competitive in its market. “We’ve always done it this way,” has been the last words of many doomed or dying organizations. Communication and transparency allow for a conversation that introduces the need for change and seeks buy-in from all stakeholders.

Change leaders must also understand that it is intrinsic in human nature to dislike and to resist change. Employees are not machines that can be quickly reprogrammed and expected to function at peak capacity the instant a switch is flipped. People bring their emotions– with strong investment and attachment to:

  • the quality and value of the work they do
  • their title and role they play in the organization
  • their ability to provide leadership on some level
  • a sense of purpose
  • their lifestyle and financial compensation

Determining the pace of change in the organization must – of course – be adequate to keep the company moving towards a strong, profitable, and sustainable business future. At the same time, the rate must be established and managed to give employees the time to:

  • accept the challenges of the transition
  • consider, grasp, and identify their role in the new organization
  • work through their fears and (reasonable) insecurities
  • discover how they can make new and valuable contributions
  • obtain additional training or coaching

Determining the pace of change requires striking a balance between moving the organization through the stages of change and recognizing that some plans may need more time than others. In a future article, I will share how Implementing the Pace of Change makes this happen.

Consultant and Author, Jim Rohn stated, “if you are not willing to risk the unusual, you will have to settle for the ordinary.” Learn how Trilogy has helped some of our clients take strategic risk to incorporate necessary changes HERE and contact us HERE.


About Hal Levenson

Hal Levenson is the Founder and Chief Visionary Officer at Trilogy Partners. Trilogy Partners is an advisory & implementation firm whose mission is to help companies grow and transform. We accomplish this by focusing on 3 critical business areas: Financial, Strategy & People.