Monthly Archives: May 2017


Shut Up and Lead!


by on May 31, 2017 9:38 AM

Have you ever thought, this would be a great place to work if we didn’t have any employees? Truthfully, it has crossed my mind on a few occasions over the years. How can any leader have such thoughts about our most valuable assets? The answer is simple, we shouldn’t. John Maxwell states “a leader is one who knows the way; goes the way; and shows the way.” Effective leaders will model the expected behaviors through actions, not words, leading to the concept of “shut up and lead.”

During the early 1990’s, Zenger-Miller published The Basic Principles for Success. Since then, I have adapted these principles as the foundation for professional relationships and the paradigm for expected organizational behavior. The principles are truly basic in concept but often difficult to achieve. They require faithful modeling from the highest level within the organization for success.

Principle 1: Focus on the work process, issue, or behavior, NOT the person. It’s human nature to make things personal in the workplace but this automatically brings emotion into the equation. Principle 1 will drive an objective approach allowing for better problem solving and decision making. My observation is that Principle 1 is more difficult in closely-held and family businesses however the results are often more powerful when practiced consistently.

Principle 2: Maintain the self-confidence and self-esteem of others. Leave sarcasm at the door! It is the greatest form of aggression in the workplace and highly demotivating. Contributing fully and risk taking is easier in a climate of trust and acceptance.

Principle 3: Maintain strong partnerships with your internal and external customers. Everyone knows how they want to be treated as a customer. Think about the potential if every employee within the organization was a customer of each other. How about other strategic partnerships and connections? The possibilities are endless for constructive and effective relationships.

Principle 4: Take the initiative to improve work processes and partnerships. Don’t only take the initiative, encourage others to do the same. Acknowledge and respond to all initiatives so your employees know that you welcome ideas and feedback.

Principle 5: Hold yourself and others accountable for commitments. Make sure there are identified positive and constructive consequences and be consistent in all interactions.

Principle 6: Lead by example. Employees want you to “know,” “go,” and “show” the way through your actions, not words. Leaders have much to gain when they can model the needed actions and attitudes to deal with the demands of business and relationships.

Effective leaders strive to practice The Basic Principles in their daily interactions. I have found that adhering to these principles will allow you to “shut up and lead” more confidently and with greater optimism to achieve your desired results.

If you are interested in implementing these principles to create an atmosphere of trust, cooperation, and positive action, contact Trilogy’s Alliance Partner Bill Ehrhardt at (609) 688-0428 or at behrhardt@gettrilogypartners.com.

Driving Accountability in Your Business


by on May 1, 2017 12:05 PM

One of the most common concerns raised by business leaders is the desire to strengthen accountability in their organization.  When Trilogy Partners examines this concern with them, we often discover that each business owner has his or her own definition of accountability, and they all have very different views on what accountability looks like.  Let’s take a closer look at what the term means and the leadership behaviors you can focus on to strengthen accountability.

We define accountability as accepting responsibility; disclosing results in a transparent manner; being candid about your actions and the actions of others.  We recognize that defining the term is much easier than bringing it to life inside an organization.  The place to start is to look in the mirror.  Are you creating a team environment where accountability will flourish?

Patrick Lencioni, author of The Advantage, has defined four disciplines to help build healthy teams.  We turned these into four key questions that you should ask yourself as you examine the level of accountability in your organization.  If you can say “YES” to each, you will be driving accountability:

1. Have you built a cohesive leadership team?

To create an environment inside your company that will foster accountability, you must start at the top – by assembling a healthy leadership team.  That is, a team with a high level of trust and mutual respect, a team that lives by a set a well-defined core values and that is comfortable with healthy conflict.  A team with those qualities is passionate about addressing the truly tough issues facing the business and resolving them.  Team members believe in using data to drive their decisions, and they focus on team results more than individual accomplishments.

2. Are you creating clarity?

Have you answered these questions with your leadership team?

  • Why does our company exist?
  • How should we behave with each other, our customers and our vendors?
  • What is our core focus?
  • What does good performance look like? How will we succeed?
  • What is most important to do, right now?
  • Who must do what?

3. Are you overcommunicating clarity?

About the time you feel your answers to those questions have been well communicated, your team is just beginning to hear you.  It is essential that you define consistent answers to those questions and that you never stop asking and answering them.  In Lencioni’s words, you must be your own “Chief Reminding Officer”.

4. Are you reinforcing clarity?

You will reinforce your clear messages if you recruit, hire, orient, evaluate, compensate and reward your team members around the core values you have defined, and constantly discuss the answers to the questions listed above.

If you want to answer “YES” to these questions, contact Trilogy’s Alliance Partner Rip Tilden at rtilden@gettrilogypartners.com or at (609) 688-0428.  We have tackled the issue of accountability with many clients and as one noted, “Trilogy has helped our firm build a culture based on truth, knowledge, constructive debate, a passion to win, and the courage to face and fix mistakes.”